Educational technology company Great Learning on Monday said it has roped in Indian cricket team captain Virat Kohli as its brand ambassador.

As the face of the Great Learning brand, Kohli will now lead the brand's latest 'Power Ahead' campaign, which underlines the importance of lifelong learning and showcases how high quality learning at the right time can help professionals and students power ahead in their career, the company said in a statement.

Commenting on the development, Great Learning Founder and CEO Mohan Lakhamraju said,

"Virat is the obvious choice to be our brand ambassador because he best embodies the Great Learning ethos of excellence and continuous learning."

The respect that he commands globally, across all age groups, and the connection that he has with the youth make him the perfect partner "to deliver our message of powering ahead in one's career through online learning", Lakhamraju added.

On his association with Great Learning, Kohli said, "Upskilling is all about one's aspiration to get better every day and willingness to work really hard for it. It is something I closely identify with. I also share the same passion for excellence that Great Learning does and am excited about our association."

Great Learning said it is launching a multi-film campaign with Kohli during the upcoming Dream 11 IPL, where the brand is associate sponsor on Disney+ Hotstar.

Virat Kohli

Indian Cricket Captain, Virat Kohli

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The Gurugram-based edtech startup has so far delivered over 30 million hours of transformational learning that has empowered 300,000+ learners by helping them upskill in technologies like Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Analytics, Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity, Digital marketing, etc.

In March 2020, amidst the COVID-19 outbreak, Great Learning also launched its free learning resource, the Great Learning Academy, to help professionals upskill themselves. Over four lakh learners have already benefited from the platform including employees from 700 leading global MNCs and PSUs as well as students from over 1,000 universities and colleges including IITs, IIMs, and NITs.

(Disclaimer: Additional background information has been added to this PTI copy for context)

Edited by Megha Reddy

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Original Source: yourstory.com

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Screenshot 2019 11 08 at 14.29.14Disruptive digital-only banks, innovative regulations, and shifting consumer demands have made today’s banking digital-first — but the benefits of digitization are being held back by identity verification challenges.

Identity verification underlies many of the core processes associated with financial services, with banks required to subject their customers to strict identity checks, both to protect those users’ finances and to meet regulatory compliance demands.

There have been a plethora of efforts aimed at streamlining identity verification online, but these attempts have largely failed to address the issue in its entirety. For example, customers are often required to create unwieldy passwords and verification details that can be difficult to keep track of to access their accounts. Not only have these efforts created new points of friction for users, but they’re also expensive for banks, with each password reset costing up to $70 according to Forrester Research estimates.See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Deutsche Bank is partnering with Google Cloud to use its cloud computing capabilitiesPaytm has agreed to acquire insurance firm Raheja QBE for $76 millionGig workers pose a huge revenue and brand image opportunity for banks

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3 Ways To Motivate People Via Behavioral Science

The science of human behavior is a river of with exclamations, curiosities, prevarications and humble confusion. But among the currents and eddies often there are useful insights that help us navigate daily life.

One such notion was introduced by Jason Hreha, a Stanford graduate and one-time co-author with Dan Ariely. Hreha is now Global Head of Behavioral Sciences at Walmart, the world’s largest employer.

About a year and a half ago, Hreha was talking with a former member of President Obama’s Social and Behavioral Sciences Team.

According to Hreha in a recent email, the small group became a roaming behavioral economics consultancy during the final three years of Obama’s presidency. They worked on various projects, big and small, across various agencies.

After a few different case studies, says Hreha, it became clear — the Social and Behavioral Sciences Group was all about simplification.

Every single project the person described to Hreha, involved taking some bloated government process or solution — and making it smaller, quicker, easier.

An example. Pretend the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) wants to increase the health insurance application rate, but it just so happens the application process is 45 minutes long and requires people to fill out a health-status questionnaire.

The behavioral sciences SWAT team would want to cut down the application length as much as possible (from 45 minutes to 10) by eliminating or shortening steps. In this case, the team might ask DHHS to re-design the form so that healthy applicants can fill out the health-status portion with a couple of clicks (“I am a healthy person”, etc.).

Since healthy applicants are the ones least likely to use health insurance, a tweak like this could increase the application rate for this group — important because this group pays for health care they rarely use.

Bureaucrat-designed processes tend to be longer than necessary, so a behavior-change strategy focused on shortening and simplifying government forms makes a lot of sense.

Which brings us to the three types of behavioral interventions.

1. Simplification
2. Motivation
3. Instigation

Simplification is all about making a behavior easier.

Motivation is all about making a behavior more enjoyable or exciting.

Instigation is all about making a behavior salient or top-of-mind. It’s about reminding people to do a behavior.

The White House behavioral team was focused on simplification, which made sense for the types of problems faced in government.

But in our personal lives and the business world, points 2 and 3 are equally important.

Whenever you’re facing a behavior problem related to brand or business, it’s useful to think about these three categories.

Ask yourself: Is there a way to make this behavior simpler? Is there a way to make this behavior more intentional, enjoyable or exciting? Is there a way we can make sure this behavior is memorable and repeated?

Contributed to Branding Strategy Insider by: Patrick Hanlon, Author of Primal Branding

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Are You Building A Brand Of Contradictions?

As brands continue to try and navigate a world of awakening and change, its clear they are on a learning journey. With plenty of opportunities to learn, from women’s rights, climate change, homelessness, immigration, and now racial equality. It’s impossible to be against any of these issues. So why do brands feel the need to state the obvious?

As Mark Ritson writes in a scathing and powerful MarketingWeek article, “We marketers live in a branding bubble of our own creation. We think brands matter. That our brand matters. We think advertising is important. We think other people care. And with each passing year our branding bubble appears to become less and less transparent. An increasing proportion of marketers lose touch with the consumers they are meant to take their coordinates from, and fall for the bullsh*t that their brands and their communications make any kind of difference to society at large – and that this impact is a crucial part of their job.”

I think brands matter a great deal. But I also think actions speak louder than words, or inexpensive GIFs that can be spun up in seconds and posted to social media with little effort and even less accountability. Let’s look at some examples:

Joining a chorus of brands, Amazon statement said that “inequitable and brutal treatment of Black people in our country must stop” and promised to “stand in solidarity with the Black community—our employees, customers, and partners—in the fight against systemic racism and injustice.” But what about that time they fired a black contractor for asking about the Coronavirus? Or that time they tried to smear a warehouse organizer as “not smart or articulate.”

A Vice article shares how Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi tweeted something similar, stating the company “stands in solidarity with the Black community and with peaceful protests against the injustice and racism that have plagued our nation for too long.” To that end, he announced a $1 million donation to two racial justice think tanks “to support their work in making criminal justice in America more just for all.” Yet in the background, Uber is fighting legislation that would reclassify their workforce and entitle them to benefits such as health insurance and minimum wage. With a large number of minorities comprising the workforce, how solid is that solidarity?

Ritson’s article in MarketingWeek includes numerous examples of our most highly cherished brands: Apple, Nike, Adidas, Spotify, L’Oreal – each of which has professed strong alignment to the movement for racial justice, even donating money to associated causes, yet all of their senior leadership remains white. Riston clarifies, “I am not saying that companies have to have black people in their leadership teams as a general policy. But if you believe what you are telling the market about black voices, it should start with switching out some of your white executives in your upper echelons for executives of color. Not because these people are bad. Not because you have to encourage more diversity in the boardroom. But because you are claiming to care about black issues and black representation – so do something meaningful about it.”

In a tweet, writer and brand strategist Vikki Ross shares how she answered one of her clients who asked “should we change our logo?” with a series of pointed questions that’s worth reading, internalizing and spending some time thinking upon:

Do you support the cause? Or do you want to look like you do?
Do you always support the cause? Or do you support the cause when it is trending?
If you change your logo to support the cause, when do you change it back?
When you change your logo back, don’t you support the cause anymore?
If you can change your logo back, when will you do it?
What happens if another cause is trending? Do you change your logo again?
How do you keep up with showing support for every cause? What if you miss one?
If you keep changing your logo, what is your logo?
Should you just always do what feels like the right thing at the time? Assuming your business is always doing the right thing, whether it promotes it via its logo or not.

Yes, these are challenging times. #blackouttuesday would have been better if brands had just gone dark, and listened, and thought about the changes they will or won’t make, before rushing to deploy content and messaging. We know there is hurt, and we know most of the people on this planet want to do something to make the hurt less. But we need to remember that actions speak louder than words.

Like people, brands need to be the change they profess to want to see.

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