FILE PHOTO: A woman looks for information on the application for unemployment support at the New Orleans Office of Workforce Development, as the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New Orleans, Louisiana U.S., April 13, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos BarriaReuters

US jobless claims for the week that ended on Saturday totaled 1.9 million, the Labor Department said Thursday. That slightly exceeded the median economist estimate.
That brought the 11-week total to nearly 43 million. But Thursday’s report also marked the ninth straight week of declining claims.
That ultimately means that more than one in four American workers is currently out of a job. 
Continuing claims, which represent the aggregate total of people actually receiving unemployment benefits, were 21.5 million for the week.
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Millions of Americans filed for unemployment insurance benefits last week as the coronavirus pandemic continued to force layoffs nationwide.

US jobless claims totaled 1.9 million for the week that ended on Saturday, the Labor Department said Thursday. That slightly exceeded the median economist estimate of 1.8 million unemployment filings.See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Economists forecast a nearly 20% unemployment rate and 8 million payrolls cut in the May jobs report. Here’s what to watch.One-third of unemployment benefits have yet to reach AmericansEconomists forecast that an additional 1.8 million Americans filed for unemployment last week

Original Source: feedproxy.google.com

Zurich Insurance Group on Thursday said property and casualty claims related to the coronavirus pandemic could total around $750 million this year, after booking $280 million such claims in the first quarter.

Original Source: cnbc.com

First-time claims for unemployment insurance were expected to increase 3.05 million last week, according to economists surveyed by Dow Jones.

Original Source: cnbc.com

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