joe biden nancy pelosi
Former Vice President Joe Biden and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

President-elect Joe Biden met with top Democrats in Congress on Thursday to discuss another COVID-19 relief package, which has been stalled in Washington.
Biden spoke on a call with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer about the growing need to distribute aid to Americans bearing the brunt of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.
“They discussed the urgent need for the Congress to come together in the lame-duck session on a bipartisan basis to pass a bill that provides resources to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, relief for working families and small businesses, support for state and local governments trying to keep frontline workers on the payroll, expanded unemployment insurance, and affordable health care for millions of families,” according to a press release.
Congress initially passed the CARES Act with bipartisan support at the onset of the pandemic but has since struggled to come to a consensus on a follow-up stimulus package.
Since then, the House of Representatives has passed an additional stimulus package, but the GOP-controlled Senate has bristled at the cost. Similarly, the Senate put forth a “skinny” version of a stimulus package that was shot down by Democrats as not enough to help the American people.
The White House has been inconsistent with its messaging, with President Donald Trump at times shutting down talks and other times demanding a larger bill than the Democrats’ plan.
Pelosi, who had been in talks with the White House to negotiate a bill, has been under fire from members of her own party in the House for the continued delay, as critics ask her to prioritize the needs of Americans over the politics of the bill.
Pelosi responded to critics saying that they don’t understand the nuances of the bill as conversations continue while the US braces for surges in infections in the fall and winter months.
Alongside discussing the fallout of the pandemic and how to remedy it, the trio also touched upon Biden’s legislative plans that will spur bipartisan support.
“They also discussed the importance of finding bipartisan solutions to create millions of good-paying union jobs, including through investments in infrastructure, manufacturing, research and development, and clean energy,” the press release read.
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The pandemic has had a massive impact on many things—our daily and work routines, hygiene habits, the way we socialize, shop, and behave in public, our plans as well as those of many businesses and governments, and a slew of many other things.

Many of us have grown accustomed to the way the world has changed, but are also looking forward to the time when things will go back to normal. Alas, not everything will remain the way it has been because of how drastically the coronavirus has changed the world and the way it used to work.

So, it does seem appropriate to wonder what has been changed forever. Reddit user u/Cuish has recently asked that very question—what will never be the same again once the pandemic is over?—and Reddit delivered over 17,000 responses.

Bored Panda invites you to read through some of the best and most thought-provoking answers to the question. Scroll down to read through them and make sure to comment and vote on the ones you liked the most.

#1My marriage.

My wife and I had to work from home together (separate jobs) from March until September when she had to go back to the office. I am still working from home. During this time, we became increasingly closer. I have heard so many stories of marital problems being caused by Covid. I literally miss my wife everyday she has to go to work.

I meet her at the door like a fucking puppy. They say absence makes the heart grow fonder. Sometimes forced proximity does too.

Image credits: level 1 quimbykimbleton

#2Hopefully your boss will finally admit that all his dumb meetings actually could have been emails all along.

Image credits: cassiecas88

#3The phrase “avoid it like the plague” – turns out people don’t do that.

Image credits: puntilnexttime

#4A massive amount of people now know they can work from home.

Image credits: OttoManSatire

#5Time spent with my kids.

Pre-pandemic I would leave the house 5 days a week at 6:15am to commute to the office, usually before anyone else in my house is awake. And I’d get home most evenings just in time to put them to bed. I’ll never go back to that. The past 8 months I’ve actually seen my boys grow up in front of my eyes and I get lots of quality time with them every day, even with work from home.

I know now what i was missing.

Image credits: darylcarolan

#6Blowing out the candles on your birthday cake

Image credits: level 1 Speakinmymind96

#7I will not take hugs for granted.

Image credits: Joesdad65

#8Anytime you’re sick, you’ll wear a mask. I’m amazed at all the times I flew before when I had a cold, and didn’t wear a mask.

Image credits: idi0disq0

#9Office life. My company has already announced that once we are allowed to go back, we’d only be going once or twice a week. It seems many realized how feasible working from home is.

Image credits: GarionOrb

#10My dogs have expected me to basically be around all the time and rub their belly’s 24/7#11My definition of “personal space.”

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#12People coming into work sick to show how dedicated to work they are or saving those days for ‘mental health days’ meant ironically.

No Justin! Don’t come over to my desk with your coughing and runny nose telling me how bad you’re ‘roughing it’ at work to get some sympathy. “If you’re looking for sympathy, look under the dictionary between shit and syphilis”!#13As a current college student, I am in favor of keeping recorded lectures. It’s way more helpful than just having notes or slides.

Image credits: dan4mt

#14Shopping will continue to be mostly online and malls will likely die out faster than they were already going to.

Image credits: FrogginBullfish_

#15Most of the mom and pop stores in my town are gone forever. Some of these stores I grew up with, the nickle arcade, the tiny French bakery my aunt took us to when we got good grades, the only ramen shop open after 10PM, my favorite donut shop, the fancy British tea shop I never had a good date in but many London Fogs that were utterly perfect, the only dim sum place, the handmade mochi and tea shop, the only cigar shop in town to get fancy cigars…

I lament the death of all these tiny businesses I took for granted. I always thought they’d be around. Now my community is left with just brand named box stores, no more originality and flavor. Just closed skyrise buildings surrounded by a garishly lit Denny’s, Olive Garden, and Target.

Image credits: Not-A-SoggyBagel

#16Working in an office, particularly in Japan.

I live in Japan. Going to the office and spending all day here is a deep cultural tradition. So many companies here, even in the early COVID days, flat out publicly said “Hah, no, we will NEVER be doing that ‘work from home’ thing, sorry. That’s laughably naïve.”

Then, the country issued a “Declaration of National Urgency” (not an actual Emergency, as that would entitle the govt to be actually accountable to the livelihoods of the people, just a very strong arm public stance and shaming businesses into following suit).

And those traditional Japanese businesses saw what happened to their bottom lines when they no longer had to pay for electricity, heating/AC, cleaning, office equipment and maintenance, subsidized travel expenses to/from work, soft items like coffee and snacks, etc… and so many of them now are singing the praises of a “sensible work from home policy” and planning for even long-term work-from-home options.

Image credits: Diamond_Sutra

#17Health care workers going to work without a mask on. Definitely took for granted seeing my co workers smiling faces during my long shifts

Image credits: madif0626

#18I’m hoping that this convinces the (American, pretty much everyone else has this figured out already) masses that healthcare is a human right and should not be tied to employment. The pandemic has shown that plenty of people lose their jobs through no fault of their own, despite their best efforts and that should not condemn them to either going without healthcare or accumulating crippling debt when they lose their health insurance coverage.#19Obliviousness to how many things I touched between hand washings

Image credits: level 1 snortingdietcoke

#20Literally this morning, our local paper reported that the government is aiming to achieve full internet coverage throughout Indonesia, reaching even the remote villages by 2024. We had a local meme as our boomer minister said a few years back something in the line of “Why do we need strong internet access?” It took the poor stealing smartphones for the sole purpose of letting their kids attend online classes to convince them. So the answer to the question is: some boomers’ view on the value of internet accessability.#21My waistline

Image credits: Sk8rmom

#22Childhood development theories – we now have an entire group of children who have missed what are regarded as developmental milestones. Learning to play cooperatively with others, learning to share, empathy building, etc. It will be very interesting to see the research coming out over the next decade or so#23As a nursing assistant… I will be forever oh so hesitant to get near someone (particularly the elderly who like to cough directly at you) without my eye-shield and mask.

Image credits: Pigvalve

#24They’ll probably leave the plexiglass things up. That’s probably it.#25Drinking fountains.

Image credits: indianalayla

#26Hopefully frequent handwashings will become the norm. And hand sanitizers in shops, restaurants and public spaces.

As someone who refuses to touch food if I haven’t washed my hands (I am emetophobic, I’m terrified of the stomach flu), this endless supply everywhere I go is really nice. And people who usually don’t care about washing their hands do it more often!#27Having been the funeral organist for numerous pandemic-caused deaths:

I can bear first-hand witness to the sad fact that the families and friends of the departed brought to their death by COVID-19 will never be the same.#28Food delivery just being dropped off on your doorstep. Remember when you had to go outside and make EYE CONTACT like some kind of PERSON?! No more, my friends. Just leave it outside and I’ll get it when I’m ready. No more scrambling to find pants when you’re half baked and hungry…#29It’s annoying how (seemingly) quickly my life went from talking about where we wanted to buy a house to discussing the possibility of moving back in with my parents for a while.

RIP live music career, you will be missed.#30I am afraid that a lot of karaokes and spas in our country will go out of business.#31Standing next to someone after they sneeze#32Movies, unfortunately. Cinema specifically. I’m sure a lot of production companies will take enormous losses or possibly file bankruptcy as no one is paying to go see movies anymore. The other issue being that no one can really make movies at the moment either. Travel bans all over, logistic issues, actors not able to be within close proximity to one another, and then all the post-production work that, for the most part can’t be done from home. Little to no support for creative arts jobs from governments around the globe. Artists encouraged to retrain in other sectors.#33Dating is going to get even more app related which isnt good for most people honestly. Especially if people work at home more and dont go out for entertainment.#34My attitude towards my entertainment backlog. Previously I used to look at my PlayStation library or my Netflix list and think “If I just had a few weeks off,I could make a serious dent”

I’ve had more then a few weeks off and my backlog seems if anything more endless,I’ll probably be in the retirement home with that little voice in the back of my head going “Peaky Blinders is meant to be good,should get on that”#35Fewer weddings, more elopements.#36I have the impression that people has shown their worst part and this will have consequences for long time#37People actually knowing what 6ft looks like. Seriously, everyone’s estimations of 6ft distance have been just gradually decreasing and decreasing to a point where most people are hanging out 3ft away and thinking it’s 6#38Cruise Ships… dubious that industry will come out the other side without radical changes#39Snow days (for school)#40Video games. They feel like they did when I was a teenager again. Usually I feel guilty that I’m not doing something more productive, but right now I could care less about spending a whole weekend doing almost nothing but playing video games.

Original Source: boredpanda.com

GettyImages 1228989987
U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., the United States, on Oct. 9, 2020.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday sent a letter to her Democratic colleagues calling the Trump administration’s latest stimulus offer “wholly insufficient.”
Over the weekend, the White House proposed a $1.8 trillion measure, a figure that’s too high for many Senate Republicans and too low for House Democrats.
On Sunday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows urged Democrats to pass a measure repurposing leftover funds from the Paycheck Protection Program.
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The Trump administration’s latest stimulus proposal is “grossly inadequate,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to her Democratic colleagues on Sunday, suggesting Congress and the White House are no closer to a deal on a coronavirus relief package.

Over the weekend, the White House proposed a $1.8 trillion stimulus measure, angering both Senate Republicans, who consider that number far too high, and House Democrats, who passed a $2.2 trillion proposal last month.

The White House proposal includes a $400 boost in weekly unemployment insurance, $1,200 stimulus checks for US adults, and $1,000 checks for each child, The Washington Post reported.

Democrats have pushed for a $600 increase in weekly unemployment benefits and $1,200 checks for child dependents, as well as substantially more funding for state and local governments.

In her Oct. 11 letter, Pelosi decried the administration’s proposal, saying the disagreements have to do with more than the top-line numbers.

“[I]n terms of addressing testing, tracing, and treatment, what the Trump administration has offered is wholly insufficient,” she wrote.

Senate Republicans are equally unimpressed, CNN reported. “I don’t get it,” Florida Sen. Rick Scott told White House officials on a phone call this weekend, two sources told the news outlet. Tennessee Sen. Marsha Blackburn said the larger White House proposal would “deflate” the GOP base, the sources said.

With a deal between the White House and Congress seemingly out of reach, the Trump administration is also lobbying for a stimulus measure that would repurpose $135 billion in leftover funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, Politico reported.

Democrats have previously shown little interest in the idea, complaining about a lack of transparency with respect to how PPP funds were used — and seeking a much larger stimulus for an economy in recession.

In their appeal, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows urged an end to the impasse, which last week saw President Trump call off negotiations before reversing himself in the wake of bipartisan anger.

“The all-or-nothing approach is an unacceptable response to the American people,” the officials wrote.

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: [email protected]

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Unemployment benefits

New US jobless claims for the week that ended Saturday totaled 898,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The reading came in above the consensus economist estimate of 825,000, and also marks an increase from the previous week’s revised figure.
Continuing claims, which track Americans receiving unemployment benefits, fell to 10 million for the week that ended October 3. That was lower than economist forecasts.
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The number of Americans filing for unemployment insurance rose last week, indicating discouraging progress around the US labor market’s ongoing rebound.

New US weekly jobless claims totaled an unadjusted 898,000 for the week that ended Saturday, the Labor Department announced Thursday morning. That reading came in above the median economist estimate of 825,000 compiled by Bloomberg, and also reflects an increase from the prior week’s revised total.

Continuing claims, which track the aggregate total of Americans receiving unemployment benefits, slid to 10 million for the week ended October 3. The reading came in slightly below the median economist estimate of 10.6 million.

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Read more: The investment chief at a $750 million firm explains why the bull market will forge on regardless of election outcome — and shares the 12 highest-conviction stock picks that make up her market-beating strategy

Roughly 65 million unemployment-insurance filings have been made since early February, trouncing the 37 million sum seen during the 18-month Great Recession. Thursday’s report comes in well below the highs seen earlier in the pandemic but still lands above the 665,000 filings made during the Great Recession’s worst week.

The millions of Americans still unable to find work are set to endure tougher economic conditions in the near term. Democrats and Republicans remain far apart in reaching a stimulus compromise, and Wall Street economists increasingly expect new fiscal relief to arrive after the November elections.

Read more: US Investing Championship contender Trent McGraw hauled in a 104.3% return in just 8 months. He shares his two favorite trading setups that’ve led to his king-size returns.

While most polls point to a strong Biden victory in the presidential race, Senate election outcomes will “mean the difference between substantial fiscal expansion and fiscal gridlock,” Morgan Stanley said in a Wednesday note.

The lack of another expansion to unemployment benefits also leaves jobless Americans more prone to lingering debt through the pandemic. A recent study by researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that Americans on unemployment insurance benefits used nearly half of the benefits to pay down debts. Roughly 24% of the payments were used for buying essential goods, and 23% were saved.

Read more: Morgan Stanley lays out its 5 favorite trades for investors looking to dominate a looming V-shaped recovery, even if a stimulus deal takes until 2021

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steven mnuchin
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

The Treasury has upped its offer on federal coronavirus spending by some $100 billion as it continues negotiations with Democrats, Roll Call reported.
The politics news site reported that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin offered a $1.62 trillion package when talking to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday.
They didn’t reach a deal Wednesday but committed to keep trying, Roll Call said. But even if they do strike a deal, it could still struggle to make it through Congress.
The two parties have been in a standoff as Democrats seek to secure much more spending than Republicans.
One source of agreement is that both Mnuchin and Pelosi want another round of $1,200 checks to be sent to Americans.
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The Treasury is increasing the amount of money it would support for a new coronavirus spending bill as it continues to negotiate with Democrats, Roll Call reported Wednesday night.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin offered a $1.62 trillion package in his Wednesday talks with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the report said.

The increased offer is said to include more money for education and state and local governments than before.

Pelosi and Mnuchin met for 90 minutes without striking a deal. But after, both seemed hopeful of continuing negotiations and reaching some kind of agreement.

One issue that is not in question: Both sides have said they support another round of $1,200 direct payments to Americans.

Nancy Pelosi
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

This week has been the first major negotiation on more federal spending to address the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic since talks most recently collapsed in August.

The parties have been trying to find common ground, with Democrats seeking a more expansive package: They have proposed spending $2.2 trillion. Republicans have argued for a far smaller amount.

After meeting Pelosi, Mnuchin told Fox Business that he would aim for somewhere between $2.2 trillion and an earlier offer of about $1 trillion.

“We’re not going to do a $2.2 trillion deal,” he said.

Mnuchin said President Donald Trump “instructed us to come up significantly, so we have come up from the trillion-dollar deal that we were working on earlier.”

He said the White House proposal was in the “neighborhood” of $1.5 trillion.

The politics site Roll Call said the following measures were in the latest version of the Treasury offer. The details have not been confirmed publicly or by other news outlets.

Direct payments of $1,200 for adults and $500 for dependents, which Democrats had signaled support for.$250 billion for state and local governments ($186 billion less than Democrats proposed but $100 billion more than in the White House’s previous offer).$150 billion for education (Democrats want $225 billion).$400 a week in additional unemployment insurance ($200 less than Democrats proposed but $100 more than Senate Republicans proposed).$75 billion for COVID-19 testing and tracing (this meets Democrats’ demand, while Republicans had offered $16 billion).$175 billion for healthcare (Democrats had proposed $249 billion for the Department of Health and Human Services).$10 billion for the US Postal Service (Democrats had proposed $25 billion and then dropped it to $15 billion).$160 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program.Nearly $120 billion for businesses like restaurants and entertainment venues.$20 billion for farmers and ranchers.Negotiations are underway

It is not clear whether Senate Republicans would support such a proposal.

The White House and Senate Republicans had proposed a $1 trillion plan in the summer, and in September they floated a “skinny” plan, worth $500 billion.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell recently called $2.2 trillion an “outlandish” request. He also dismissed the idea of getting a deal through Congress before the November 3 election when talking to reporters after Pelosi and Mnuchin’s meeting on Wednesday, The Hill reported.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The source who outlined Mnuchin’s proposal to Roll Call suggested that McConnell might consider the latest proposal viable, but a spokesman for McConnell denied this.

Democrats have not yet voted on their $2.2 trillion plan, delaying it until at least Thursday to see what the outcome of talks between Pelosi and Mnuchin are.

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