Launched in 2014, StoryBites is a weekly feature from YourStory, featuring notable quotable quotes in our recent articles. Share these gems and insights from the TechSparks speakers with your colleagues and networks, and check back to the original articles for more insights.

In Part IV of our special collection of quotes from YourStory’s TechSparks 2020 coverage, we present insights on the roles and responsibilities of founders (see Part II and Part III) as well). Check out our earlier quotes compilations from conference editions in 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, and 2014.

See also our compilation of quotes from the top Tech30 startup founders of 2020, and profiles of the Tech30 startups over the years: 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2011.

When you become the first to break the code, you also become the reference. – Chef Vikas Khanna

When you’re category-defining, you’ve to see if you’re helping shape an ecosystem. – Shailendra Singh, Sequoia Capital

We have to develop knowledge, and humility is absolutely essential for that. – Sridhar Vembu, Zoho

Clarity of thought is as important or even more important than performance today – and it has to be well articulated too. – Anu Hariharan, Y Combinator

A lot of tech entrepreneurs get so involved in algorithms and science…it is all very important, but we need to focus on what you present to the world. – Rajashree R, TCS

The narrative strikes a chord on the other side. It has to come from the heart and has to mix with the substance of your business plan effortlessly – so that it becomes a part of you. – Anup Jain, Orios Venture Partners

Good startup founders are good storytellers. Unless you have a good story, you won’t be able to pique any interests. – Saurabh Jain, Paytm

If you look at companies with the best culture in the world, they have a history of treating their employees the same way as their customers. – Anoop Suresh, Springworks

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Although the number of women-founded and co-founded startups are on the increase, investors are still sceptical about investing in women tech entrepreneurs. – Nikhil Rungta, Verizon Media

Success is common, but enduring success that can last for decades is rare. – Shailendra Singh, Sequoia Capital

Brand strategy IS business strategy because it involves purpose, company culture, brand behaviour, and experience design. – Mohit Jayal, Motherland Joint Ventures

You will doubt yourself, you will doubt your abilities, and you will doubt your decisions and actions. But it's important to persevere and not lose sight of your dreams. – Sonu Sood, actor and humanitarian

Be very brave. Do not compromise on vision. – PB Venugopal, Lexus India

You go through a lot of ups and downs and you really need someone who can be a friend, not just a business partner. – Vibhore Goyal, CoCubes

The more you chase a money goal, the more the goal post keeps shifting. You are always in an unsatisfied zone. – Nithin Kamath, Zerodha

Founders need to keep the board and investors aligned, and then be honest with themselves as this requires both short term and long term goals. – Shweta Bhatia, Eight Roads Ventures India

Be in the driver seat of your own life and not let anyone else drive the direction of your life. – Aaksha Meghawat, Apple

The last-mile human touch always helps. People giving their time, knowledge, and energy…passion matters. – Suniel Shetty

You can’t have strategy doing the work all the time. You've to let the odds and serendipity take over sometimes. – Shailendra Singh, Sequoia Capital

COVID-19 has been the mother of all wake-up calls. – Sarbvir Singh, PolicyBazaar

We are all not in the same boat, but we’re all in the same storm. – Suniel Shetty

The post-pandemic business environment will be one represented by growing geopolitical complexity, a more polarised society, and the chance for backlash if the popular sentiment is hurt. – Madan Bahal, Adfactors PR

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The most enduring companies gain dominance because of their unique understanding of market asymmetry or inflection point. – Pieter Kemps, Sequoia Capital India

High winds doesn’t make great sailors, light wind sailing makes great sailors…they equalise everything. – Ashish Hemrajani, BookMyShow

We need to slowly start changing complainers to entrepreneurs…because complainers will have problems and can be problem solvers. – Gururaj ‘Desh’ Deshpande

The best time to do something new is today. – FM Nirmala Sitharaman

The system makes it extremely hard for young entrepreneurs to succeed. If, as a country, we keep ridiculing risk-takers, we will always be a nation of job seekers. – Kunal Shah, CRED

The day you think there is no scope for improvement, the game is over. – Byju Raveendran

India has a valuable talent pool, and this is a very powerful mechanism to create opportunities within India and develop products of value for the world. – Karan Bajaj, WhiteHat Jr.

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Stressed your cup is half-empty not full? Remember you always need to stay grateful. – Tahira Kashyap Khurrana, ‘The 12 Commandments of Being a Woman’

You deal with the world the way it is, not the way you wish it was. This is where you develop character. – John Chambers, JC2

We must ask ourselves, can we make a difference? Can we be innovative and creative and not just look at the money value of what we've done but the contribution it has made to our humanity and our human population in India? – Ratan Tata

YourStory has also published the pocketbook ‘Proverbs and Quotes for Entrepreneurs: A World of Inspiration for Startups’ as a creative and motivational guide for innovators (downloadable as apps here: Apple, Android).

Edited by Suman Singh

Original Source: yourstory.com

Launched in 2014, StoryBites is a weekly feature from YourStory, featuring notable quotable quotes in our articles of this past week. This special series of compilations focuses on India’s COVID-19 struggle (see last week’s post here). Share these quotes and excerpts with your networks, and check back to the original articles for more insights.

Food safety issues and the enhancement of health security are of growing national and international concern. – FSSAI report

COVID-19 transformed the fish and meat purchasing behaviour of consumers dramatically. Due to safety concerns, consumers made the habit-forming shift to ecommerce. – Shan Kadavil, FreshToHome

Health is no more about medicines; it is now a way of life. – Sanjaya Mariwala, OmniActive Health Technologies

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted the lives of people with disabilities. Visually impaired persons cannot avoid touch and cannot maintain physical distancing in their true sense. – Prashant Ranjan Verma, NAB

The lockdown period has drastically changed individual behaviours and highlighted the need for safety and comfort. – Paul Abraham, Hinduja Foundation

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The pandemic brought enormous human suffering, but the quarantine and economic fallout brought the cash flow crisis. – Patrick Schwerdtfeger, 'Pandemic, Inc.'

It’s competitive to raise funding in any environment and even more so during a crisis of such a magnitude. If you are in a sector that’s in favour right now, do raise a bit more than required to have some buffer. – Jatin Desai, Inflexor Ventures

Any and every profession involves some risk, whether it is delivering food, working on a desk, or running a company. – Raghav Joshi, Rebel Foods

Leading global bodies project that there will be a contraction in global energy demand over the next few years also. – PM Narendra Modi

The coronavirus pandemic has set women professionals back by more than a decade, further disbalancing gender parity at work. – Anuranjita Kumar, WiT India

The pandemic has given rise to unpaid care work that women provide and there has been a reduction in external investment towards women-led enterprises as businesses continue to be affected due to disruption. – Naghma Mulla, EdelGive Foundation

Being used to the traditional office culture, many people don’t have the right frame of mind to work remotely. It takes time, discipline, and dedication to develop that. – Zahara Kanchwalla Zahara, Rite KnowledgeLabs

Corporate campuses are now allowing extended lunch hours to help mitigate the risk by limiting the number of people who can be present in the cafeteria at a time. – Sandipan Mitra, HungerBox

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COVID-19 has accelerated India's digital transformation and a workforce that is equipped with future-ready skills will be the key to unlocking the country's next phase of growth. – Anant Maheshwari, Microsoft India

As consumers have shifted online, more companies are looking at how they can take advantage of this digital shift and the vast economic opportunities that come with it. – Bhavik Vasa, GetVantage

The blue-collar ecosystem is undergoing massive digital transformation and the ongoing pandemic has accelerated this adoption. – Pravin Agarwala, Betterplace

As the city builds back from COVID-19, there is a demanding need for an accessible, affordable, and safe everyday commute option. – Aravind Sanka, Rapido

During COVID-19 pandemic, consumers began demanding social change in the fashion industry by seeking more sustainable brands. – Rina Dhaka, RE.purposed

Comfort is the priority for most men now especially since most of them are working from home these days. – Prince Kumar, Cantabil Retail

Change and evolution is part and parcel of life – but the beauty of theatre and art is that while nothing stays constant, everything stays the same. – Arundhati Nag, Ranga Shankara

YourStory has also published the pocketbook ‘Proverbs and Quotes for Entrepreneurs: A World of Inspiration for Startups’ as a creative and motivational guide for innovators (downloadable as apps here: Apple, Android).

Original Source: yourstory.com

Brushed under the carpet for long, mental health is finally getting the attention it deserves.

Sarbvir Singh, CEO, PolicyBazaar, on Wednesday said health insurance policies provided by all insurance providers would cover mental illnesses from October 1, 2020, under the new health insurance rules issued earlier this year.

“This is a big initiative. At large, people will now start considering mental health as an ailment which needs treatment,” Sarbvir said.

The PolicyBazaar CEO was speaking at YourStory’s flagship virtual conference TechSparks 2020 along with Shradha Sharma, Founder and CEO, YourStory, and Tanuj Shori, Founder and CEO, Square Yards.

The new health insurance policies would also clarify claim rules, coverage for telemedicine, and new definition of pre-existing disease among others.

Sarbvir said COVID-19 was a great opportunity to get things that we have always wanted to do in healthcare "done". "Today, there is no shortage of people on internet. But COVID-19 accelerated digital adoption only because there was no other option," he said.  

Digitisation had also led to a shift in the role of insurance agents.

Sarbvir said insurance agents now had more time to focus on building relationships and understanding the needs of customers, rather than investing time in administration tasks.

He added that technology will continue to play a huge role in the future.

“It's not just building apps or making user journey more efficient; it’s effectively trying to bring the ecosystem together to do the job in a better, more efficient way. All we need is to step out of our boundaries.“

For more information on TechSparks 2020, check out our TechSparks 2020 website. Sign up here to join the event. 

TechSparks – YourStory's annual flagship event – has been India's largest and most important technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship summit for over a decade, bringing together entrepreneurs, policymakers, technologists, investors, mentors, and business leaders for stories, conversations, collaborations, and connections that matter. As TechSparks 2020 goes all virtual and global in its 11th edition, we want to thank you for the tremendous support we've received from all of you throughout our journey and give a huge shoutout to our sponsors of TechSparks 2020. 

Techsparks 2020

Edited by Teja Lele Desai

Original Source: yourstory.com

Adapting to 4C of global warming

Emma Howard Boyd’s speech to the Committee on Climate Change’s Adapting to 3C+ of global warming conference

Before I start my speech, I’d like to add my condolences to the Committee on Climate Change and everyone who knew Professor Dame Georgina Mace.

Georgina’s work assessing the impacts of climate change and the effect of adaptation on the natural environment has never been more important.

Her contribution will help every one of us shape a more resilient world in the future.

That goal is what my speech today is all about.

When you look out of a train window, the trees up-close fly by in a blur, the fields in the middle distance glide past, and the far-off hills don’t appear to move at all.

Similarly, in public life: newspaper headlines fly by in a blur, political shifts glide past, and the natural world doesn’t appear to move at all.

Or so it was… until the climate crisis began to distort and accelerate environmental change.

Today, it is as if when we look out of the train window, we can see the far-off hills gathering speed and catching up with our train.

Without adaptation, climate change could depress growth in global agriculture yields up to 30 percent by 2050, disproportionately affecting small farms around the world.

The number of people who lack sufficient water, at least one month per year, could soar from 3.6 billion today, to more than 5 billion by 2050. We take the first line of COVID defence – washing our hands – for granted in the UK, but Water Aid point out this is a luxury that billions of people can’t afford.

Rising seas could force hundreds of millions of people in coastal cities from their homes, with total costs of more than one trillion dollars each year by 2050.

Climate change could also push more than 100 million people in developing countries below the poverty line by 2030.

No wonder more and more people are experiencing “eco-anxiety”.

I want to thank:

The Committee on Climate Change;
The National Centre for Atmospheric Research;
And, the UK’s Climate Resilience Champions…

…for inviting me, for hosting this event, and for showing leadership on adaptation.

And, I want to apologise if I’ve made everyone’s eco-anxiety worse.

What I really want to do is raise the profile of the UK’s expertise on adapting to climate change.

There are many things to be optimistic about.

We definitely have the knowledge in this country to deliver on the Prime Minister’s ambition for a green industrial revolution that “will create hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of jobs”.

That said, any discussion of the green recovery automatically infers the possibility of significant climate shocks.

The Committee on Climate Change and the Adaptation Committee do a superb job of integrating both agendas.

I hope the Environment Agency’s goal to become a net-zero organisation by 2030, will also demonstrate how to do both at the same time.

And, the joining of the FCO and DFID is an opportunity to improve these links in Government.

As we know, countries most vulnerable to climate risk often criticise developed nations for being too focussed on reducing emissions, rather than helping them prepare.

The new FCDO potentially means we can better unite work to enhance the world’s green economy, with helping our neighbours prepare for the humanitarian impacts of climate change.

Last week, Dr Saleemul Huq, Director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development at the Independent University, Bangladesh, commended the UK’s push to begin a “race to zero emissions” at COP26, and suggested:

“There could also be a race to zero vulnerability of every country by 2030 as an equivalent to the race to zero emissions.”

Treating mitigation and adaptation as two sides of the same coin is key to the success of the green recovery from coronavirus…

…and also the UK’s ability to inspire a game-changing international agreement at COP26.

Here in England, the Environment Agency has been criticised for saying we are helping the country prepare for 4 degrees of global warming.

The accusation is that we are suggesting such a future will be manageable, and so we are protecting the status quo by overstating our abilities.

Today’s conference feels like an appropriate place to address that.

In 2018, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said we have 12 years to hold global warming to 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels.

Last year, the insurance giant Aviva measured investments in its equities portfolios against the goals of the 2015 Paris agreement, and found they are on track for a 3.4 degree rise.

As a result, they have announced a new 2050 net-zero carbon emissions target for their auto-enrolment default pension funds.

And they should be applauded for that leadership.

But, distressingly, their analysis – calculated using Carbon Delta’s warming potential metric – said the FTSE 100 index as a whole is heading towards 3.9 degrees.

To be reductive, my view is this:

No government or government agency can possibly know what the status quo looks like in either a 1.5 degree or even a 3.9 degree world… but if we don’t take significant action to both reduce emissions and adapt right now, we’re on a hiding to nothing.

Even though the Environment Agency has a huge amount of practical, place based expertise to lend to this effort: it would be daft to suggest that we, or even the Government, can do this alone.

Creating a more resilient country depends on listening, collaboration and action from local communities, through national government and the private sector, to the international stage.

Last month – which (incidentally) was the warmest September on record globally – the Environment Agency’s Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management Strategy finished its journey through Parliament.

Which means we can now put it into practice.

To do this we need individuals, communities, charities, businesses, farmers, land managers, and infrastructure providers, to build up the resilience of millions more homes and businesses.

This means the construction of hard flood defences, river channel maintenance and sustainable drainage systems, nature based solutions, property level resilience, and alternative land management practices…

We will work with anyone and everyone – even the beavers – to identify the best combination of measures to tackle unique risks in specific places.

Our work got a significant boost this year, when the Government announced a record £5.2bn long-term investment to accelerate flood scheme construction in England.

It is money well spent: for every £1 used to improve protection from flooding and coastal erosion, we avoid around £5 of property damages.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority say that between £29 billion and £37 billion of infrastructure projects will be brought to market in the remainder of this financial year.

If even a small portion of those investments is dedicated to resilience, the long term benefits will reward local communities as well as shareholders.

I read the other day that the wildfires in northern California have expanded beyond 1 million acres.

This means the fire can no longer be called a “megafire” but needs a new classification: it’s a “gigafire”.

Last month, the State of California joined the Coalition for Climate-Resilient Investment, launched by Alok Sharma at the UN General Assembly last year.

The CCRI is made up of businesses and organisations that now represent over 10 trillion dollars in assets.

That kind of crazy money shows that adaptation is no longer a niche topic of green finance: people in the City increasingly get it.

Just over a week ago, Storm Alex brought over a month’s worth of rain to some parts of the country… we were lucky it didn’t hit us as it did France and Italy.

But, it’s only mid-October and there’s already a lot of water in the ground.

Everyone needs to be ready this winter, so please check your flood risk and look up what to do in a flood.

The Environment Agency is ready.

During the height of the coronavirus lockdown, we developed safe ways of working enabling more than 90% of flood schemes across the country to continue.

And, consultations continue to be carried out virtually with communities.

The flood schemes will better protect people.

For example, the £11m scheme in Lancaster, ensuring that flood risk in the city is significantly reduced…

… and the £4.8m Marton West Beck scheme that will protect 485 homes in central Middlesbrough against flooding from the beck, the sea, and surface water.

Whether too much water in the form of floods; too little in the form of droughts; or poor water quality from pollution…people’s relationship with water is threatened by changes we see today.

These changes are linked, so our response should be joined up too.

It doesn’t make sense to deal with flood protection and environmental improvements in separate silos.

At the Environment Agency, these teams work closely together, sharing information and expertise…

… not to mention offices and depots…

… because it’s vital to take an integrated approach to water management in catchments.

The River Severn Partnership takes a collaborative approach to deliver resilient development in an area with low productivity but a significant rural economy.

We are working with the community, business and government to make the economy more resilient to flood and drought, while potentially giving the area an annual £11.4bn uplift.

In London, we’ve worked on an innovative regulatory approach to the new super sewer – The Thames Tideway – to help deliver an enormous infrastructure project that will not only lead to improved water quality and habitats…

… but has created 2,800 jobs in construction, will increase flood resilience, and create new riverside public spaces.

The coronavirus has held the world’s attention in 2020, but this was also a year when so many powerful storms formed over the Atlantic, the US National Hurricane Center ran out of names for them.

Adapting to multiple changes all at once can’t be done by looking at the world from one perspective.

In June, the former President of Ireland Mary Robinson wrote:

“It is imperative that the recovery from COVID-19 is completely aligned with addressing the urgency of the climate crisis.

“We need to listen to the young people, to climate-vulnerable states, to indigenous peoples, to women, to the scientists, to environmental defenders, and we need to ensure the global community is supportive of their needs, including action on the provision of climate finance.”

I hope we get our act together in this “climate decade” so we are only heading for a 1.5 degree world, but the economic analysis suggests we’re heading for a 3.9 degree world.

And yet! There are reasons to be positive, as David Attenborough and Prince William’s “Earthshot” prize will no doubt demonstrate.

I look with optimism towards a green recovery from coronavirus in which we both reduce emissions, and also adapt.

But, at the Environment Agency we don’t just hope, we’re getting on with it.

Thank you very much.

Emma Howard Boyd is Chair of the Environment Agency

Original Source: businessgreen.com

Whether you want to free yourself from the personal and financial restrictions of employment or you just want to supplement your salary with some extra spending money, working for yourself or starting and growing a business has never been easier — and there’s never been a greater choice of roles to choose from.

Below are several incredible freelance and small business opportunities in a variety of different industries you can start working on today.

Home & Remote Business Opportunities

What’s not to love about working from home? Zero commute, complete kitchen facilities, and maybe even the ability to work in your pajamas.

Here are some great business opportunities that will allow you to work from the comfort of home:

1. Professional Consulting

Those with an enviable track record in setting up or helping to grow businesses have easily-transferable skills they can use to make money from home.

Market yourself as a professional consultant who assists others in launching and building successful businesses through online sites like Clarity. Alternatively, you could also offer (and charge more for) in-person consultations, either going out to visit clients on their turf, or having them come to your home office (although you should probably get changed out of those PJs first).

2. Home-Based Child Care

Childcare is and always will be essential to many families, and daycare centers don’t come cheap. If you’re already spending the day keeping a watchful eye over your own little ones, why not pocket a little extra cash by undercutting the “pros” and providing childcare to friends and neighbors, too?

3. Tutoring

What in-demand skills do you have that you can teach to others? Business skills like consultancy are generally the most profitable, as you can charge much more for your time — but it’s usually harder to find clients, and many of your bookings will be one-off training sessions.

Other skills, from teaching languages to music to helping with reading or writing, are all easy to turn into businesses — and they can be reasonably lucrative and hugely rewarding, too.

What you can charge will depend upon your experience, location, and vocation you’re teaching; just don’t expect to make your millions this way. That said, most of your customers will visit on a recurring basis, so tutoring should at least provide you with a regular, reliable income.

4. Elder Care

Like childcare, care for the elderly is an essential service that will always be in demand. What’s more, those that need it often do better when able to remain in their own homes instead of moving into assisted living.

While certain elements of care require medical qualifications, helping clients with day-to-day tasks like shopping, cleaning, and cooking do not.

5. Private Chef

If you’re skilled in the kitchen but don’t fancy the long hours and stressful environment that’s synonymous with full-time restaurant work, you might want to consider working as a private chef instead.

Exactly what this entails will vary from job to job, but expect to mainly be dishing up quality cuisine to groups of friends and family at dinner parties. Just bear in mind that you might need to employ waitstaff to serve food and drinks and look after guests.

6. Driving

The gig economy isn’t for everyone, but for the right person, driving for Uber or Lyft are great ways to make a little cash. You can choose the hours you drive, and the app will automatically connect you to clients who need a ride. 

7. Thrifting

Have you ever seen a piece of furniture on Craigslist that has potential if someone would just give it a little TLC? If you are particularly handy, you could go to thrift shops and garage sales, pick up items at low prices, refurbish them, and turn them around for a higher price.

This concept doesn’t just apply to furniture, either. If you have a good eye, you could scout for collectibles, oddities, and more. Auction sites like eBay can connect you with a wide audience looking for your items.

8. Makeup & Hair Styling

Proms, weddings, and other special occasions compel people to look their best. You can become an independent stylist and have people come to your home studio, or you can make house calls or work on-location. Eventually, you might consider opening up a salon or spa, but many independent artists love the flexibility of working from home and/or being mobile.

9. Pet Sitting

Just like in-home child care, pet sitting is an industry that you can tap into to make extra money. Many folks want the peace of mind knowing that someone is there for their fur baby, ensuring they’re comfortable and safe while they’re gone. Sites such as care.com help put potential clients in front of pet sitters in their local area.

10. Airbnb

If you have an extra room, casita, or property, you can use it to earn money when you sign up as an Airbnb host. You can list your space for free, and Airbnb does all the heavy lifting for you, making it easy to attract and host travelers. You can charge what you want, and Airbnb even protects you with property damage and accident insurance.

Online Business Opportunities

Online business opportunities also afford you all the benefits of working from home, but even better, many of them allow you to work from absolutely anywhere (which has never been easier or more fun, thanks to the ever-growing coworking industry).

Tommy Landry of Return on Now, explains this transformation. “One of the major changes to ‘how we work’ over the past decade is the massive shift toward free agency, i.e. freelancing, consulting, or running solopreneur-types of businesses,” he says. “While many older workers were taught to pursue security in the form of a full-time job, that is no longer the only way to make a living. In fact, it has become super easy to make the leap out to independence heading into 2019. You could consult or freelance in a number of areas from copywriting to marketing strategy, or run your own ecommerce business from your home.”

He also advises that no matter which path you choose, the smart way to “escape” your full-time job is to start making this transition while you’re still working. “I started my own business as a side gig back in 2009, while running marketing teams for local high tech companies,” he explains. “It took 2.5 years to build up the business enough to sustain a living income, and I went full-time in 2012. I’m living proof … if you want to run solo, you can do it with the right business model, a sound exit strategy, and a lot of hard work.”

11. Gig Work

Want a way to start making money in minutes? Sites like Upwork, Freelancer,  and People Per Hour allow you to do just that.

Another valuable (but often overlooked) resource for finding freelance work is Craigslist. “Craigslist has a whole section devoted to Gigs you can join to make additional money,” says Carl Sednaoui, Director of Marketing at MailCharts.

Just bear in mind that these jobs aren’t scalable. What they are, however, is a great way to make a little extra pocket money by outsourcing your skills on your own terms.

Some sites are better than others — in terms of both opportunities and pay — so you should do your research to find the best match for your skills, abilities, and expectations.

It’s also well worth considering some sound advice from Foundr‘s Jeremy Noronha. “Go where your customers are, not where your competition is,” he advises. “Many freelancers who get started tend to hang out in the online communities with their peers and not their potential clients. The best way to develop and build the right relationships is to provide value in all the places your ideal clients spend their time.”

Some skills are more in demand than others. The rarer the skill (and the better you are at it), the more you can expect to earn. 

12. Web Design

It can be tough to find great web designers and developers, and that’s why freelance web designers are highly sought after. As Ashley Faulkes, founder of Mad Lemmings explains, one of the biggest reasons behind this is the fact that the industry is overrun with cheap-yet-underskilled designers and developers.

“Web design and development has gotten a bad rap lately with so many cheap options available, but I still find clients who want a personal and professional touch,” she says. “You can start with the basics, and produce top-notch sites using online tools, or start with WordPress and good themes and page builders. Focus on quality and great communication and you will soon make a name for yourself.”

13. App Development

More than half of all web traffic is mobile. It may be competitive, but if you’ve got the skills, there’s big money to be made either in developing and distributing your own app or developing apps for others.

14. Amazon Selling

While the working conditions of Amazon’s own employees regularly come under fire, there are plenty of ways to make money through Amazon without being on its payroll.

Thanks to services like Amazon Fulfillment, it’s easier than you might think to sell products from home, since Amazon will pick, pack, and deliver your orders for you. The service can even enable you to import and export outside your home country.

Other opportunities include self-publishing ebooks (you can learn more about writing books that sell here) and affiliate marketing, which involves linking to Amazon products from your website, and earning a commission if a link is clicked and a purchase made.

15. Etsy Selling

Etsy is the platform for selling goods such as arts, crafts, jewelry, and much more. Basically, if it’s handmade, vintage, or just a little bit different, Etsy’s the place to find it (and sell it).

16. Course Creation

Sites like Udemy and Coursera allow you to market, sell, and profit from courses you’ve created yourself. Few of the courses are accredited, but that’s reflected in the price students pay.

They’re also far more popular than you might think. “Online courses are huge right now,” says David Hoos, Head of Marketing at The Good marketing agency. “They can be incredibly helpful to develop niche skills and businesses will often use them for professional development purposes. If you have a unique skill that you can organize and share, a course is a great way to do it!”

17. Virtual Assisting

Working as a virtual personal assistant takes minimal skill and is easy to get into, since there are always businesses looking for people to take on day-to-day grunt work without the cost of hiring an assistant in-house.

18. Influencer Marketing on Social Media

This one might sound like wishful thinking, but countless people are making substantial amounts of money simply by having a large and engaged social following.

Sure, it’s not for everyone, and even if it is for you, it takes time to become successful. That said, if you’ve got the right personality and patience, making money using your influence online is a very real possibility.

19. Freelance Writing

With the demand for digital content, you can position yourself in front of clients who need text produced for their websites or other collateral. The most popular freelance opportunities are in:

Content writing – Writing article content to drive traffic.
Copy writing – Writing sales copy to drive conversions and revenue.

In addition, you can even be more specialized within those functions. For example, you could focus on case studies or whitepapers.

Federal Business Opportunities

This might sound surprising in the age of corporate giants, but where possible, the U.S. government supports small businesses by contracting work out to local independents. This means there are always opportunities for the “little guy” to get their foot in the door with the federal government. You can view a forecast of contracting opportunities here.

Meanwhile, common federal business opportunities include:

20. Construction

This could entail constructing new government buildings or updating or maintaining existing buildings. Even simple janitorial work is understandably always in demand.

Opportunities are typically listed on job sites like Indeed and Simply Hired.

21. Security

Security is, understandably, of extreme importance in government buildings. While this will include security measures like cameras and alarms, security personnel are often employed in order to screen visitors and patrol the interior and exterior of buildings at off-hours.

While you can provide security services as a sole contractor, the business is easily scalable by employing and finding work for others.

22. Consultancy

Consultants are experts in a specialist field who are employed to advise those with less knowledge and experience than themselves. Government consultants are no different.

Don’t expect finding work in this area to be easy, however. You’ll need solid proof of your ability to do the job, and you may well be required to have a degree — in some cases, even a master’s or Ph.D.

Other Business Opportunities

If none of the opportunities above sound like something you could leverage, here are a few other lucrative business opportunities that could be the right fit for your skills:

23. Personal Training

Health, fitness, and general wellbeing are big business. That means those with the skills to help others be their best are in high demand. That includes personal trainers, for one.

So how do you get started as a personal trainer?

Personal training is an unregulated industry, but that doesn’t mean your 3-year gym membership qualifies you to help others improve their strength and fitness. If you don’t know what you’re doing, you could cause somebody serious injury.

You can read up on reputable personal training courses and what to do once you’re qualified, here.

24. Real Estate

In many states, you can complete the required training, become a licensed agent, and start a new career in just a few weeks or months. While it does require an investment of time, money, and effort, it can be well worth it. You can be your own boss, work a flexible schedule, and have the potential to make a lot of money. While there is no shortage of real estate agents in the industry, there’s still plenty of space for agents who genuinely want to do the best they can for their clients. Learn how to get a real estate license here.

25. Turnkey Businesses

Turnkey businesses offer an ideal startup model for those with limited time or budget, largely because the time investment is minimal.

Examples of turnkey businesses include storage units, laundromats, and automated car washes — basically, turnkey businesses are those that are largely self-sufficient and can almost manage themselves.

26. Trade Work

If you’re skilled in DIY and happy to compete on price while making a name for yourself, you can start leveraging your skills for cash right away.

Don’t know a hammer from a hacksaw? Then enroll in a course and learn. Skilled trades are one of the few industries in which demand outstrips talent. Whether you want to start out on your own, or begin by working for someone else, the pay is good, the work is rewarding, and job security is pretty much guaranteed.

A few trades you might want to consider include:

Carpentry
Plumbing/HVAC
Iron work
Cabinetry
Auto repair
Auto detailing

27. Lead Generation

Almost all B2B companies have a need for leads. What they don’t all have is the time to acquire them.

While there are numerous services offering up automated lead data, the quality of those leads is questionable at best. That means there’s good money to be made sourcing qualified leads for time-strapped, growth-focused companies.

AeroLeads‘ Pushkar Gaikwad has some good advice on how to do this. “Partner with local marketing agencies and provide them with B2B data, prospects and leads, based on their requirements,” he says. “You can gather such data using various free and paid online tools. Later you can start your own lead generation agency, too.”

28. Food or Coffee Truck

Running a restaurant or coffee shop is risky business, primarily because overhead is so high. Traditional brick-and-mortars are not your only option when it comes to managing a food or drink business, however. You can be super-successful for a fraction of the cost with a food or coffee truck.

Izaak Crook of AppInstitute agrees. “Food trucks are a fantastic way to showcase your culinary expertise without the overhead of opening a static restaurant — and what’s more, you can take your food on the road to different events and festivals to raise awareness of your brand,” he explains. “Create your own mobile app for your truck and help to build a loyal customer base through offering a loyalty scheme — and even offer pre-ordering so that punters don’t have to wait out in the cold whilst you prepare their meals!”

The key to any successful small business is knowing exactly who your audience is, how you plan to attract and serve them, and why they should buy from you. Start planning for your business today.

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in December 2018 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

Original Source: blog.hubspot.com