Did you know 43% of workers would be willing to leave their companies for a 10% salary increase?

Compensation is an important factor in attracting and retaining employees, especially in sales. Imagine if almost half of your sales team left the company because of a poorly designed compensation plan.

The results wouldn’t be pretty.

If your sales organization is struggling to strike a balance between company requirements and the compensation needs of employees, it’s likely time to reevaluate your compensation plan and commission structure.

As a salesperson, it’s valuable to know what types of commission plans are available and what salary and commission rates you should look for from an employer.

Luckily, I’ve compiled some resources for you to determine the best sales commission structure for your sales team or yourself. Ready to learn more?

In his book, “The High-Velocity Sales Organization“, sales strategist, Marc Wayshak, discusses how important compensation and commission is to your sales infrastructure. He offers a few tips to keep in mind when creating a commission structure:

1. Don’t cap salaries.

Capping salaries decreases the earning potential of your salespeople. Sales management should be supportive of their team and want individuals to make as much as possible in return for their hard work.

2. Do it right the first time.

In sales compensation, there isn’t room for do-overs. Introducing a new compensation plan moves your sales team’s goals and targets, diminishing your reps’ morale and motivation.

3. Keep it simple.

Make your compensation and commission plan clear. Not only will this make the commission structure easier to implement, but it will also ensure there aren’t any loopholes in the plan. A salesperson should be able to fill in the blanks: If I do X, then I will make $Y.

So, what commission structure should you choose? Well, there are a few to pick from. Common structures include:

1. Base Salary Plus Commission

With this plan, salespeople are provided a base salary with commission. The standard salary to commission ratio is 60:40, where 60% is fixed and 40% is variable.

This structure is ideal for companies where sales rep retention is critical to the success of the sales organization. The company is actively investing in the success of the rep while incentivizing their performance.

2. Straight Commission Plan

With this plan, sales reps’ income comes directly from the sales they earn. There is no base salary.

This structure is ideal for startups with not a lot of capital because the sales rep assumes the risk by giving up the security of a steady salary. High-performance sales reps can thrive in these environments, but be prepared to experience the difficulty of maintaining stability in roles with commission structures like this.

3. Relative Commission Plan

The relative commission plan is when a target or quota is set. Let’s say a salesperson has a quarterly quota of $90,000 and a quarterly commission of $10,000. If they meet 85% of the quota, they’ll receive 85% of the commission.

This is in addition to their base salary, which can help incentivize underperformers without causing the turnover that often happens with roles under a commission-only plan.

4. Absolute Commission Plan 

This is when a commission is paid as a result of engaging in specific activities or meeting specific goals. For example, a salesperson might be paid $1,000 for each new customer. Like the relative commission plan, it can help incentivize underperformers, but the emphasis is less on revenue and more on activity.

5. Straight-Line Commission Plan

A straight-line commission plan rewards salespeople based on how much or little they sell. For example, if they reach 90% of their quota, they receive 90% of their commission. However, if they exceed quota, their commission increases. This is a great way to incentivize underperformers to meet quota as well as those who consistently meet quota to overperform.

6. Tiered Commission Plan

A tiered structure encourages reps to put in extra effort by providing higher commission as they hit substantial sales milestones. Here, reps could be paid increasing commissions as they meet their quota, exceed their quota, and continue to close more deals than they’re expected to.

This is ideal for organizations with salespeople who consistently reach (but not exceed) their goals while having a little more control on commission rates than the straight-line commission plan.

7. Territory Volume Commission Plan

With this commission structure, salespeople work with clients in clearly defined regions. And they’re paid on a territory-wide versus individual sale basis.

This is ideal for team-based organizations who are wanting to fortify in specific service areas.

This ultimate guide to sales compensation provides even more detail on sales commission structures and compensation plans. And it will help you determine which structure will work best for your company and sales team.

Averages for salary and commission allow sales leaders to see how their sales commission plan compares to the rest of their industry. And for salespeople, they can see how their sales compensation plan stacks up.

Average Sales Commission Rates by Industry

The wages below are from the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey. These wages reflect the median average pay for each industry. The commission rate will depend on the company and the commission structure they choose.

1. Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives
Median pay: $61,660

These kinds of sales representatives sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses, government agencies, and other organizations. Their job security and livelihood is often almost entirely intertwined with the volume of merchandise they can sell. Their commission structure tends to reflect that. These reps are often paid with absolute or base salary plus commission plans.

2. Insurance Sales Agents
Median pay: $50,600

Insurance sales agents contact potential customers to sell different kinds of insurance. Agents spend time directly interfacing with clients, completing paperwork, and preparing presentations. They also fulfill other customer-facing and administrative responsibilities. Commission for this brand of sales is generally paid on a base salary plus commission basis. Commission percentages tend to vary by the type of insurance agents are selling. 

3. Advertising Sales Agents
Median pay: $51,740

Advertising sales agents sell advertising space to businesses and individuals. They often work across a variety of industries and media, including advertising agencies, radio, television, and Internet publishing. Advertising sales agents often have strict quotas and receive a commission for meeting or exceeding them.

4. Real Estate Brokers and Sales Agents
Median pay: $50,300

Real estate brokers and sales agents help clients buy, sell, and rent properties. Every state requires real estate sales professionals to be licensed. That could mean completing courses or passing a state-specific exam. They’re often self employed, so many have the flexibility to define their own commission structure.

5. Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents
Median pay: $64,120

Securities, commodities, and financial services agents buy and sell securities or commodities in investment and trading firms. They can also provide financial services to businesses and individuals. Some advise customers about stocks, bonds, mutual funds, commodities, and market conditions. These salespeople often charge flat-rate commissions either per share or per trade.

6. Sales Representatives, Services, SAAS, Business Support, Telecommunications, All Other
Median pay: $54,550

This category of sales encompasses salespeople in positions and industries in a wide variety of service-based businesses, including business support, technical consulting, electronics, telecommunications, computer systems and electronics, and software as a service. Given the wide range of industries and companies encompassed in this category, it can be hard to identify its most common commission structure.

7. Door-to-Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers
Median pay: $26,430

Several different kinds of salespeople fall under this category, including professionals in telecommunications, residential building construction, and subscription programming. Given the wide range of industries and companies encompassed in this category, it can be hard to identify its most common commission structure.

8. Retail Salespersons
Median pay: $25,250

Retail sales refers to the occupation in which merchandise (such as clothing, furniture, or appliances) are sold in a retail brick-and-mortar environment. These environments include everything from general merchandise stores to dealers specializing in specific wares such as sporting goods or musical instruments.

Since success is often dependent on foot traffic rather than sales activity, retail salespersons are often compensated by a base salary only. However, retail environments with high-ticket items often pay flat commission rates. 

9. Sales and Related Workers, All Other
Median pay: $33,220

This category of sales encompasses salespeople in positions and industries that don’t fall into any of the ones mentioned above. This can include roles at automobile dealerships, in non-depository credit intermediation, and with food and beverage retailers. The range of roles that fall into this category is broad, so the variety the commission structures used tends to be as well.

Before agreeing to accept a sales job at a company, you should have a clear outline and understanding of its commission structure and compensation plan. The sales commission agreement should tell you everything you need to know about the commission and salary you’re going to make.

Sales Commission Agreement

What is a sales commission agreement? It includes a salesperson’s terms of employment. The agreement also outlines the compensation structure and working relationship between employee and employer.

In short, it allows both the salesperson and their employer to agree on compensation, commission, and job responsibilities. Here are the key elements that should be included in a sales commission agreement.

1. Authorization

This section gives the okay for the salesperson to sell products or services on behalf of their employer. The employer often limits the selling by restricting the regions or territories in which the offerings are sold and prohibiting the rebranding and reselling of their products.

2. Documentation

The salesperson must agree to use documentation and tools that are approved by the company to keep track of their sales activities. For example, this would include CRM databases, software, forms, etc.

3. Non-Compete Clause

A non-compete clause requires the salesperson to refrain from representing or selling on behalf of a competitor for a period of time after leaving their employer.

4. Non-Disclosure Clause

The non-disclosure clause ensures that the employee agrees to refrain from sharing confidential information or intellectual property.

5. Commission Structure

This is where you share the details of the commission structure. After reading this section, the employee and employer should have a clear understanding of:

The compensation structure (e.g., commission, performance incentives, bonuses)
When a commission is earned
When commissions are paid
Consequences of cancellations, refunds, or default of payments from customers

6. Agreement

Both the salesperson and their employer agree to the details of the sales commission agreement by signing and dating the document.

For additional recommendations and insight, consult your legal team or seek out the advice of a lawyer to help you carefully craft your sales commission agreement.

Strategic Business Plan Examples

If you need some help developing a sales commission agreement or strategic business plan, these templates are a great way to get started.

1. Sales Commission Agreement Template from PandaDoc

Edit and customize this sales commission agreement template to fit your needs. This template can be signed by your recipients, and you’ll be able to track the document’s opens and views.

Sales Commission Agreement from PandaDoc

2. Sales Commission Agreement Template from FormSwift

This sales commission agreement template builder will help you outline the working relationship between employee and employer. It includes general information (e.g., address and phone number), commission structure, documentation, and non-compete and non-disclosure clauses.

Sales Commission Agreement Template From FormSwift

3. Sales Commission Agreement Template from RocketLawyer

With this fill-in-the-blank sales commission agreement, you’re able to quickly plug in the details for your document. And it includes a progress bar to show you how much more of the agreement needs to be completed.

Sales Commission Agreement from RocketLawyer

With a well-planned sales commission structure, you’ll attract top employees and retain them. And clearly outlined compensation plans will make it easier for employees to understand expectations and earn their commission.

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in January 2020 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

Original Source: blog.hubspot.com

Data and artificial intelligence (AI) can add $450-500 billion to India's GDP by 2025, representing about 10 percent of the $5 trillion economy aspiration of the Indian government, a report by industry body Nasscom said on Tuesday.

Nearly 45 percent of this value is likely to be delivered by three sectors – consumer goods and retail ($90-95 billion), agriculture ($60-65 billion), and banking and insurance ($60-65 billion), the report said.

Artificial Intelligence

Image Source: Shutterstock

Also ReadH-1B visa woes: Nasscom says new US executive order based on misperceptions, misinformation

The report, titled Unlocking Value from Data and AI, presented an action plan with five key building blocks to promote increased data utilisation and adoption of AI, including strategy, data, technology stack, talent and execution.

It emphasised that datasets of national importance be identified with each ministry with specific use cases, a programme to create a marketplace of data and derived assets be created, and a central agency be established for defining and enforcing data standards.

The report said platform(s) to securely host data, AI services, models, open-source libraries, applications and testbeds should be created and that policies be formulated to ensure the security, reliability, interoperability, and economic viability of the stack.

It also suggested the launch of the National Programme for AI and creation of a central, apex body to steer its execution, in collaboration with various ministries, industry groups, and other stakeholders.

The report highlighted the importance of building an AI innovation ecosystem and seeking greater participation from the private sector and entrepreneurs.

Engaging the AI ecosystem

It added that schemes to engage the AI ecosystem (industry, startups, civil society, and academia) should be created and guardrails be set up to protect public interest, while accelerating programme and economic impact.

Launching lighthouse projects in the public sector, partnerships to create data, tech and services, and grants or incentives to invest in research and innovation were also key suggestions of the report.

Unveiling the report, Electronics and IT Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said Digital India had reimagined how the government connects with citizens, and the accelerated deployment of AI and other emerging technologies would help this objective further.

"…the kind of data we are generating because of the sheer size of India, we need to leverage it…data is a national asset and this asset, we have to leverage it…

"What COVID has done is enable the world to see India's potential…we need to further exploit it. AI for three areas of human development (education, agriculture and healthcare) is very important to be focused upon," the minister said.

Debjani Ghosh, President of Nasscom, said the report can help India emerge stronger from the COVID crisis.

"Data and AI's true potential emerges from its ability to drive transformation across multiple sectors through a diverse range of applications. The report articulates the key structural steps that India needs to take to realise the value of this opportunity," she added.

The action plan and report has been reviewed by industry leaders, including Tata Sons Chairman N Chandrasekaran, Wipro Chairman Rishad Premji, Infosys COO UB Pravin Rao, and Microsoft India President Anant Maheshwari.

Nasscom will also hold Xperience AI summit 2020 in partnership with the Telangana AI Mission from September 1-4 with curated discussions on four key themes – Build AI from and for India, Scale AI Adoption in India, India's AI Policies, Thought Leadership in AI.

Additionally, deep dive sessions will be organised for developers to understand latest trends in AI technologies and use cases.

(Edited by Teja Lele Desai)

Want to make your startup journey smooth? YS Education brings a comprehensive Funding Course, where you also get a chance to pitch your business plan to top investors. Click here to know more.

Original Source: yourstory.com

How much money will you need to start a business? It’s the million-dollar question that every entrepreneur must answer.

Knowing how much money you need to start your business is critical, especially if you’re looking to raise money from investors or get a loan from a bank. 

If you overshoot and ask for too much, you not only risk rejection, but you also risk paying interest on money that you’re not spending. Ask for too little, and you risk running out of money before you’ve really given your new business a fair shot to get fully up and running.

There is unfortunately no single solution or even a specific dollar amount for individual industries. Every business is unique and costs are different depending on location — but fortunately, it’s not too difficult to calculate your startup costs

Here are the three steps you should follow to help you figure out how much money you need to start a business.

1. Create a business plan

Having an idea for a business is just the start of your business journey. To make it a reality, you need a detailed business plan.

Your business plan will help you define your business strategy which will inform your spending plan.

For example, if you’re starting a food truck, you’ll need to think about the kind of food truck you need. Do you need just a trailer that will stay parked in one location most of the time? Do you need a full-blown truck? What size? What kind of branding do you need? What equipment will you need?

Your business plan will help you think through everything you need to get your business started and help you think about the types of expenses that you’ll have as you get started.

If you need help with your business plan, check out our step-by-step guide.

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2. Create a detailed financial forecast

With a business plan in place, you can start crunching some numbers.

You’ll want to think about and plan for the following two categories of spending.

Startup expenses and asset purchases

Startup expenses include money that you’re going to spend on things like permits, business licenses, website design, improvements to your storefront, etc.

Assets are for tangible things that you need to purchase. For example, you may need to purchase inventory, computers, office equipment, vehicles, kitchen equipment, and other physical assets. A good way to differentiate an asset from an expense is to think about assets as something you could sell.

Ongoing expenses after you get up and running

Finally, you’ll need to plan for ongoing expenses and forecast those for at least the first 2 years of business. Ongoing expenses will include rent, payroll, taxes, insurance, utilities, and marketing costs. Of course, you may have other ongoing expenses as well.

With all of your spending planned, you’ll want to look at the total spending prior to getting your doors open, before you collect your first payment from a customer.

Then, you’ll want to look at what it costs your business to keep its doors open while sales ramp-up to cover those ongoing expenses.

Initial plus ongoing expenses provide a clear picture

Combine those two numbers and you’ll have a good estimate of how much money you’ll need to start your business.

A helpful tool in all of this is a cash flow forecast. You can use spreadsheets to generate your forecast, or you can use software like LivePlan to streamline the process. The idea here is to get a complete financial picture of your business and how much money is moving into and out of your business.

You can then add money to your financial forecast – loans, savings, and investment – to see how much is needed to keep you afloat while your business ramps up.

In the end, you’ll not only see how much money you need to start your business, but you’ll also see how long it will take to break even on your investment and start turning a profit.

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3. Plan for the worst

Just because your cash flow forecast says you need $50,000 in startup funding doesn’t mean that’s all you’ll ever need. You should still plan for the worst. 

To be on the safe side, it makes sense to secure 130% of the amount your forecast predicts—an extra third or so of your expected need, to provide a cushion.

After all, starting a business never goes exactly to plan. Things typically take longer than expected and cost more than planned. You’ll want to have a bit of a safety net to cover the unexpected.

Knowing the amount of startup cash you’ll need is crucial when you go to a bank or chat with prospective investors. If you’ve followed these steps, you’ve done your homework and should be able to answer any questions that come your way about potential funding.

Original Source: articles.bplans.com

Bill Gates — who illegally invests in the same industries he gives charitable donations to, and who promotes a global public health agenda that benefits the companies he’s invested in — has gone on record saying life will not go back to normal until we have the ability to vaccinate the entire global population against COVID-19.1

To that end, he is pushing for disease surveillance and a vaccine tracking system2 that might involve embedding vaccination records on our bodies. One example of how this might be done is using an invisible ink quantum dot tattoo, described in a December 18, 2019, Science Translational Medicine paper.3,4

According to statements made by Gates, societal and financial normalcy may never return to those who refuse vaccination, as the digital vaccination certificate Gates is pushing for might ultimately be required to go about your day-to-day life and business. Without this “digital immunity proof,” you may not even be allowed to travel locally or visit certain public buildings.

Gates has a history of “predicting” global pandemics with vast numbers of deaths,5 and with his call for a tracking system to keep tabs on infected/noninfected and vaccinated/unvaccinated individuals, he’s ensuring an unimaginably profitable future for the vaccine makers he supports and makes money from via his Foundation investments.

Along with Gates, The Rockefeller Foundation is also coordinating efforts in the direction of social control through the implementation of draconian COVID-19 tracking and tracing measures that are clearly meant to become permanent.

National COVID-19 Testing Action Plan

April 21, 2020, The Rockefeller Foundation released a white paper6 titled, “National COVID-19 Testing Action Plan — Strategic Steps to Reopen Our Workplaces and Our Communities.” In the foreword, Rockefeller Foundation president Dr. Rajiv J. Shah writes:

“In the face of an ineffective nationally-coordinated response, insufficient data, and inadequate amounts of protective gear and testing, we need an exit plan. Testing is our way out of this crisis.

Instead of ricocheting between an unsustainable shutdown and a dangerous, uncertain return to normalcy, the United States must mount a sustainable strategy with better tests and contact tracing, and stay the course for as long as it takes to develop a vaccine or cure.

Any plan to do so must win the faith of private and public sector leaders across the country, and of individual Americans that they and their loved ones will be safer when we begin to return to daily life.

The Rockefeller Foundation exists to meet moments like this. In the past two weeks we have brought together experts and leaders from science, industry, academia, public policy, and government — across sectors and political ideologies — to create a clear, pragmatic, data-driven, actionable plan to beat back Covid-19 and get Americans back to work more safely.”

The plan calls for testing and tracing 1 million Americans per week to start, incrementally ramping it up to 3 million and then 30 million per week (the “1-3-30 plan”) over the next six months until the entire population has been covered.

Test results would then be collected on a digital platform capable of tracking all tested individuals so that contact-tracing can be performed when someone tests positive. According to the “National COVID-19 Testing Action Plan”:

“Policy makers and the public must find the balance between privacy concerns and infection control to allow the infection status of most Americans to be accessed and validated in a few required settings and many voluntary ones.”

To this end, they suggest using incentives “to nudge the voluntary use” of tracking and contact tracing apps rather than making them mandatory. They also call for the use of “innovative digital technologies” aimed at improving “workforce monitoring and early detection of recurrent outbreaks.”

“When integrated into national and state surveillance systems, such innovations may enable the same level of outbreak detection with fewer tests.

Promising techniques include anonymous digital tracking of workforces or population-based resting heart-rate and smart thermometer trends; continually updated epidemiological data modeling; and artificial intelligence projections based on clinical and imaging data,” the document states.7

Modern ‘Wartime’ Effort That Will Cost Billions

According to the “National COVID-19 Testing Action Plan”:8

“Monitoring the pandemic and adjusting social distancing measures will require launching the largest public health testing program in American history … The effort will ultimately grow to billions of dollars per month … But with widespread business closures costing the country $350 billion to $400 billion each month, the expense will be worth it.

This testing infrastructure is intended to tide the country over until a vaccine or therapy is widely available.

Coordination of such a massive program should be treated as a wartime effort, with a public/private bipartisan Pandemic Testing Board established to assist and serve as a bridge between local, state, and federal officials with the logistical, investment and political challenges this operation will inevitably face.”

Don’t Be Naïve About Infectious Tracking Plan

Call me jaded, but this sounds like a plan to surveil Americans so that they can easily be tracked down for mandatory vaccination once a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available. It also creates the necessary infrastructure for vaccination tracking across the board, for all vaccines.

While they give lip-service to privacy and anonymization of data, privacy promises have been repeatedly broken in the past. Besides, the document clearly states that:9

“Some privacy concerns must be set aside for an infectious agent as virulent as Covid-19, allowing the infection status of most Americans to be accessed and validated in a few required settings and many voluntary ones.

The loss of privacy engendered by such a system would come at too high of a price if the arrival of a vaccine early next year was a certainty. But vaccine development and manufacture could take years, and when it comes certain populations may be excluded from receiving it for health reasons.

In the meantime, infection status must be known for people to participate in many societal functions. Legislation protecting people from being fired over infection status must be passed.

Those screened must be given a unique patient identification number that would link to information about a patient’s viral, antibody and eventually vaccine status under a system that could easily handshake with other systems to speed the return of normal societal functions.

Schools could link this to attendance lists, large office buildings to employee ID cards, TSA to passenger lists and concert and sports venues to ticket purchasers. Such connections should be made in a way that protects personally identifying information whenever possible … Whenever and wherever possible data should be open.”

patient identification number
Are You Ready to Give Up EVERYTHING Over a Virus?

“Privacy concerns must be set aside.” Infection status must be “accessed and validated in a few required settings.”

Infection status will be linked to schools, office buildings, places of work, airports, concert and sport venues — in other words, most areas people need or want to frequent, if not daily, then at least occasionally. Infection status must be known “for people to participate in societal functions.” Legislation must be passed to protect people from being fired from their jobs based on their infection status. Are you concerned yet?

Anyone who remembers the tactics employed in Nazi Germany, or anyone familiar with the current surveillance of the Chinese population, will realize where this is headed.

Reading through the plan, it should also be crystal clear that this tracking and surveillance program is not designed to be temporary. You can be strongly assured this will be permanent. It calls for hundreds of thousands of new employees, updating computer systems and new laws that in many ways resemble the implementation of TSA post-9/11.

Not addressed in this report is the question of just how often would you have to undergo testing. A negative test today may not be valid tomorrow, if you happen to come across someone who is infected between now and then. Would you have to undergo testing every single day? Once a week?

If regular retesting is not part of the plan, then the whole system is worthless as your infection status could change at any time.

Other questions not addressed: If you happen to be in the vicinity of someone who tests positive in the near future, would you have to quarantine for two weeks? Will your employer pay for that time off? Will you have a job when you come out of quarantine?

What if you quarantine for two weeks but don’t get sick and test negative for antibodies, then go out and happen across yet another person who ends up testing positive shortly thereafter. Will you be forced into quarantine again? Where does it end?

The tracking system The Rockefeller Foundation is calling for is eerily similar to that already being used in China, where residents are required to enroll in a health condition registry. Once enrolled, they get a personal QR code, which they must then enter in order to gain access to grocery stores and other facilities.10

The plan also demands access to other medical data. According to the “National COVID-19 Testing Action Plan”:11

“This infection database must easily interoperate with doctor, hospital and insurance health records in an essential and urgent national program to finally rationalize the disparate and sometimes deliberately isolated electronic medical records systems across the country …

Unfortunately, obtaining the necessary clinical data to bring these powerful analytic tools to bear has been difficult due to information-blocking tactics of electronic health records (EHR) vendors. Among the longtime tactics used by such vendors has been charging unreasonable fees for data access, requiring providers to sign restrictive contracts, and claiming patients’ clinical data is proprietary.

On March 9, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released two long-awaited final rules that would prohibit information blocking in health care and advance more seamless exchange of health care data. But publication in the Federal Register, necessary to activate the rules, has been inexplicably delayed. This delay must end.”

In other words, this plan is far more comprehensive than merely tracking COVID-19 cases. It’s designed to replace the current system of “disparate and sometimes deliberately isolated electronic medical records systems across the country.”

ID2020

While The Rockefeller Foundation’s white paper simply calls for the use of a digital “patient identification number” without indicating exactly how you would carry this ID number on your person, Gates has repeatedly talked about the “need” for some sort of implantable vaccine certificate.

In 1999, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation donated $750 million to set up Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance.12 Gavi, in turn, has partnered with the ID2020 Alliance, along with the Bangladeshi government, to launch a digital identity program called ID2020.13

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation also funded the GSMA Inclusive Tech Lab, launched in 2019, the aim of which is to promote access to digital and biometric identity services and systems.14,15

ID2020, which also launched in 2019, is designed to “leverage immunization as an opportunity to establish digital identity.” This digital identity system is said to carry “far-reaching implications for individuals’ access to services and livelihoods,” so to think that Gates’ call for implantable COVID-19 vaccine certificates would be limited to that alone would again be a grave mistake.

Like The Rockefeller Foundation, Gates is not presenting short-term, temporary measures. They’re both aiming to implement a totalitarian control system. It’s not so far-fetched to imagine a future in which your vaccine certificate or “unique patient ID number” replaces personal identifications such as your driver’s license, state ID card, Social Security card and passport, and is tied not only to your medical records in total, but also your finances.

I remain confident that it would be a tragic mistake to trust Gates, Rockefeller, Google or any of the other players that are being brought before us as the saviors of the day. While most people are well-acquainted with the Rockefeller name, few probably know the true history of the Rockefellers’ rise to power. If you fall in this category, be sure to read “How the Oil Industry Conquered Medicine, Finance and Agriculture,” which features an excellent video report by James Corbett.

Those who are ignorant of history are bound to repeat it, and if the Rockefeller story tells us anything, it is that unless we realize what has been done, we’ll be deceived again and again, because the oil oligarchy’s end game is yet to be realized — if we let them.

Original Source: articles.mercola.com

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