trumpREUTERS/Joshua Roberts

President Donald Trump said that in the next two weeks he’d be working on an executive order to require health insurance companies to cover those with preexisting conditions.
This requirement — that insurers cover those with pre-existing conditions — is already law, and it has been since the 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
Trump, since taking office in 2017, has sought to repeal or undermine President Barack Obama’s signature law.
In June of this year, the Justice Department asked the US Supreme Court to try to overturn the law.
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At a last-minute press conference held in the ballroom of his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, on Friday night, President Donald Trump said that in the next two weeks he’d be working on an executive order to require health insurance companies to cover those with preexisting conditions.

This requirement — that insurers cover those with pre-existing conditions — is already law, and it has been since the 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Big banks in the US (defined in this case as those with more than $1 billion in assets) charged customers a total of $11.68 billion in overdraft fees last year, according to data from the Center for Responsible Lending cited by The New York Times.

average overdraft fee at major banksBusiness Insider Intelligence

Vulnerable customers were hit the hardest: Just 9% of account holders paid for a whopping 84% of those overdraft fees, and those customers tended to have low balances already, averaging less than $350. The Center for Responsible Lending opined that banks should stop overdraft fees for the duration of the pandemic.See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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